Backpack Review

Mountain Hardwear Scrambler 35 Review

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Taking a brief step back from the hardgoods for our second #gearreview. I've spent a season guiding (as well as a good few trips) out of the @mountainhardwear Scrambler 35. Also available as a 25L, this pack is a climbers dream. It's made of X-Pac VX21, which is a composite fabric also used as sailcloth. It's waterproof to 200 PSI, which is plenty for rain, if not submersion. It's about half the cost of comparable dyneema fabrics. A simple stuff sack/single compartment build (but with a hydration sleeve), organization is facilitated by the 3 large gear loops, one inside the main compartment, one on each side. Ice axe attachment points aren't removable, but are unobtrusive for those staying below treeline. Quality is where this pack shines. At just 24 grams per liter (many packs in this range are about 20% heavier), you would expect it to have cut more corners than it has. Multi layer folded haul handles are soft even with big loads, the straps and foam back panel are extremely comfortable. Despite the thin webbing hip belt, heavy loads don't restrict freedom of movement. A fast-and-light mountain pack that holds up just as well as the every day carry crag pack, it rarely disappoints. Pros; • Versatile. Perfect carry-on size, light durable. Cinch down strap serves double duty, with an attachment point for when the pack lid's been removed • Water resistant enough for the rain and mountains, with the comfort and security to keep you confident while scrambling • Sturdy construction. Haul loops build to be used, and last. Cons; • Not true waterproof, not going to hold up to submersion • No padded hip belt nor load lifters. (Fine without them) • Good abrasion resistance, less great puncture resistance. Ripstop keeps holes from spreading, but a roll of gear tape can be handy. • Bottle sleeves with elastic expansions are a little smaller than ideal. Smaller bottles fit, but getting a 1L nalegene in, while the pack's full, isn't going to be fun. #getoutside #endtoxicgearculture #justbombergear #climbers #rockclimb #tradclimbing #gearstoke #climbinggear #tradisrad #mountaineering #fastandlight #alpine #backpackers #mountainhardwear #climbing #optoutside

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Reviewer: Gearnote
Instagram: gearnote
Product info: Mountain Hardwear Scrambler 35

Review:
I’ve spent a season guiding (as well as a good few trips) out of the Mountain Hardware Scrambler 35.

Also available as a 25L, this pack is a climbers dream. It’s made of X-Pac VX21, which is a composite fabric also used as sailcloth. It’s waterproof to 200 PSI, which is plenty for rain, if not submersion. It’s about half the cost of comparable dyneema fabrics.

A simple stuff sack/single compartment build (but with a hydration sleeve), the organization is facilitated by the 3 large gear loops, one inside the main compartment, one on each side. Ice axe attachment points aren’t removable but are unobtrusive for those staying below treeline.

Quality is where this pack shines. At just 24 grams per liter (many packs in this range are about 20% heavier), you would expect it to have cut more corners than it has. Multi-layer folded haul handles are soft even with big loads, the straps and foam back panel are extremely comfortable. Despite the thin webbing hip belt, heavy loads don’t restrict freedom of movement.

A fast-and-light mountain pack that holds up just as well as every day carry crag pack, it rarely disappoints.

Pros;
• Versatile. Perfect carry-on size, light durable. Cinch down strap serves double duty, with an attachment point for when the pack lid’s been removed
• Water resistant enough for the rain and mountains, with the comfort and security to keep you confident while scrambling
• Sturdy construction. Haul loops build to be used and last.

Cons:
• Not true waterproof, not going to hold up to submersion
• No padded hip belt nor load lifters. (Fine without them)
• Good abrasion resistance, less great puncture resistance. Ripstop keeps holes from spreading, but a roll of gear tape can be handy.
• Bottle sleeves with elastic expansions are a little smaller than ideal. Smaller bottles fit, but getting a 1L nalegene in, while the pack’s full, isn’t going to be fun.

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